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Watershed Symposium 2018 has ended
Welcome to the official website of the 12th Annual Salt Lake County Watershed Symposium, November 14-15, 2018!  Free and open to all, the Symposium encourages a comprehensive review of the current state of our watershed while creating learning and networking opportunities for a broad array of stakeholders. Sessions cover a broad range of topics on water quality and watershed issues with local, regional, and national relevance.  Hosted annually by Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration.

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Wednesday, November 14
 

8:00am

Registration & Check-in
Check-in, grab your badge, and meet other attendees before we kick off the Symposium!

Wednesday November 14, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

8:30am

Welcome & Opening Comments
Welcome to the 12th Annual Watershed Symposium!

Speakers
avatar for Rick Graham

Rick Graham

Deputy Mayor & Chief Operations Officer, Salt Lake County
Rick Graham is Salt Lake County's Deputy Mayor & Chief Operations Officer. Rick first joined McAdams' team in April 2016 as Township & Metro Services Executive. Rick has a nearly 40 years of public service experience, including his previous position as Salt Lake City's Director of... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 8:30am - 8:40am
Great Hall Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

8:40am

KEYNOTE Planning for an Uncertain Future: Insight from Colorado
KEYNOTE  Planning for an Uncertain Future: Insight from Colorado

Water has long shaped the West, but the future is unlikely to look like the past. How do we proactively plan to address the challenges we anticipate, and those we cannot foresee? Colorado's experience as a leader in drought mitigation and response, as well as planning for uncertainty will provide insight and lessons learned.

Speakers
avatar for Taryn Finnessey

Taryn Finnessey

Senior Climate Change Specialist, Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Water Conservation Board
Taryn Finnessey serves as the Senior Climate Change Specialist for the State of Colorado and is housed within the Department of Natural Resources. She is responsible for the implementation of HB 13-1293, overseeing Colorado’s climate change efforts, and works across state agencies... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 8:40am - 9:00am
Great Hall Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

9:10am

A National Priorities List Superfund Site in Our Own Backyard
A National Priorities List Superfund Site in Our Own Backyard

The Veteran's Administration (VA) in Salt Lake City (SLC) is conducting ongoing research and remediation of local groundwater contamination. What was the investigative process that led to the SLC VA becoming the Potential Responsible Party and why did the SLC VA utilize a remediation strategy rarely utilized by other Superfund Sites?

Full Abstract
Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) groundwater contamination was first detected at the Mount Olivet Irrigation well in the early 1990s during routine sampling of their irrigation well. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ) conducted several assessments but did not determine the source of the contamination. Today, the area surrounding this well is on the National Priorities List as a Superfund Site. What was the investigative process that led to the Salt Lake City Veteran’s Health Administration (VA) becoming the Potential Responsible Party and why did the SLC VA utilize a remediation strategy rarely utilized by other Superfund Sites? The ongoing investigation of the PCE Plume potentially resulting from VA’s investigation gives important insight to the Red Butte Creek Watershed and how the complicated geology of the area contributes to the hydrology of the Salt Lake City Watershed.

Speakers
DL

D. Lynne Welsh

CERCLA Program Manager, Veterans Health Administration
VA CERCLA Program Manager – came to VA five years ago from Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Held numerous positions over the 29 years at MDEP including 20 years leading Superfund investigations and 5 years as the MA Watershed Initiative Basin Team Leader for... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:10am - 9:40am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

9:10am

Situation Assessment of Water Quality Issues in the Jordan River

Situation Assessment of Water Quality Issues in the Jordan River

The Jordan River is a complex, multi-jurisdictional, increasingly urbanized hydrologic system. We summarize stakeholder and expert interviews to assess the current understanding of water quality issues in the river and challenges and opportunities for moving toward a shared, hopeful vision for the future.

Full Abstract
The Jordan River flows from Utah Lake to the Great Salt Lake, through about 20 jurisdictions, and is subject to multiple, complex stressors on water quality, including inputs from Utah Lake and tributaries, urban growth and development in the watershed, wastewater treatment facilities, allocation and management of flows, stormwater inputs, climate variability, etc. Future water quality of the river depends on decisions and actions taken in the near term, along with long-term management and stewardship. Over the summer of 2018, our team conducted 31 interviews with technical experts and stakeholders associated with Jordan River water quality, to assess the state of the river as a social-ecological system, along the dimensions of knowledge (do we know what we need to know?), options (what levers are available to achieve desired outcomes?), and connections (what does the network of actors and stakeholders look like?). Here, we report specifically on some of our findings regarding knowledge and options. Knowledge includes the primary sources of data, the identified data gaps, and stakeholders’ overall assessment of the current and future state of the river. Options refers to the identification of primary drivers of water quality impairments and the existing opportunities for improvement. Interviewees varied in their assessments of current conditions, but were generally optimistic about the future of the Jordan River and its potential to enhance the ecological integrity and quality of life in the valley.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Hinners

Sarah Hinners

Research Assistant Professor, University of Utah
Sarah Hinners, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah, and director of the Center for Ecological Planning and Design. She is a landscape and urban ecologist who studies the integration of natural systems into urban... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:10am - 9:40am
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

9:50am

A Snail, a Clam, and the River Jordan
A Snail, a Clam, and the River Jordan

Two invasive mollusks now dominate ecosystem function and water quality in the now novel Jordan River

Full Abstract
For better or worse, the invasive ‘good luck’ clam, Corbicula fluminea and New Zealand mudsnail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum are well established in the Jordan River, UT. Both the snail and the clam reach some of the highest densities recorded (>>5000 m-2 for Corbicula; 250,000 to 500,000 m-2 for Potamopyrgus). Based on literature review presented in this report and recent mollusk surveys conducted in the Jordan River by OreoHelix Consulting and the Wasatch Front Water Quality Council; Corbicula and Potamopyrgus are undoubtedly the most important and dominant biota in the now novel Jordan River ecosystem and together co-regulate seasonal nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon cycling, microbial community structure, and stream metabolism. The snail and clam are almost certainly seasonally controlling most other ecosystem functions as well, (e.g. water quality), despite their roles being unnoticed to most researchers and managers.

Speakers
avatar for David Richards

David Richards

Aquatic Ecologist, OreoHelix Consulting
The happy cynic



Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:50am - 10:20am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

9:50am

Watershed Restoration of Abandoned Mines in the Wasatch Mountains
Watershed Restoration of Abandoned Mines in the Wasatch Mountains

Through regular stakeholder engagement, thorough data analysis, and sound engineering, Snowbird and its partners successfully implemented pilot-scale watershed restoration and erosion control projects on high-alpine abandoned mine lands in the Wasatch Mountains this past summer.

Full Abstract
Remnants of historic abandoned mines dot the hillsides of the Wasatch Mountains. To protect and improve water quality in Mary Ellen Gulch of American Fork Canyon, Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, along with Trout Unlimited, EarthFax Engineering, Tread Lightly!, and Cirrus Ecological Solutions, implemented pilot-scale, low-risk mine remediation projects to evaluate approaches to reduce non-point source runoff and to control erosion on waste rock piles. This presentation will focus on how Snowbird and its partners were able to successfully implement this high-alpine watershed restoration project this past summer through regular stakeholder engagement, data collection and analysis, and sound engineering.

Speakers
avatar for Hilary Arens

Hilary Arens

Director of Sustainabilty and Water Resources, Snowbird
Ms. Arens is Snowbird’s Director of Sustainability and Water Resources. She has a Masters in Watershed Science from Colorado State University, and worked at the Utah Division of Water Quality as the watershed coordinator for Utah Lake and Jordan River basins. Her focus at Snowbird... Read More →
RW

Richard White

Consulting Civil and Environmental Engineer, EarthFax Engineering Group, LLC
Mr. White serves as lead engineer on many EarthFax projects, ranging from civil engineering design to environmental assessment and remediation to slope stabilization projects. He provides quality assurance/quality control and internal peer review on many of the company’s projects... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:50am - 10:20am
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:20am

Break and snacks
Look for the "big ticket" signs for places to get raffle tickets!  By visiting exhibitor tables, and more. Prizes will be raffled off during the afternoon break.


Wednesday November 14, 2018 10:20am - 10:40am
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:40am

Design, Construction and Maintenance for Permanent Erosion Control
Design, Construction and Maintenance for Permanent Erosion Control

I was never taught this! Preventing erosion from concentrated flows long after a project has ended is key to achieving water quality goals and providing for public safety. But permanent erosion control is rarely taught or designed and systems are failing. This presentation provide clear understanding of what to install and what to never install.

Full Abstract
This presentation will cover design, construction and maintenance of permanent erosion control stormwater facilities. Stormsewer facilities that will be addressed include stormsewer outlets, riprap and filter, articulated block and revetment mats, non-photodegrading turf reinforcement materials (TRMs), energy dissipaters, and trash racks. The targeted audience includes: seasoned, midlevel and entry level engineers, engineering technicians; architects; water resource managers; permitting and development review personnel for city, county, regional, state and federal agencies; and stormwater system maintenance supervisors, managers, and crew members. It includes a significant amount of photo representation or easy visualization and understanding of what works and what doesn't work. There will be numerous material and design considerations the audience will be able to immediately take back and use.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Klein

Steven Klein

Vice President, PE, PH, P.Eng, Barr Engineering Co
Steve has 40 years of experience in stormwater and natural resources management, hydrologic and hydraulic analysis, and environmental assessment to municipalities, counties, soil and water conservation districts, watershed districts, water management organizations, state and federal... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 10:40am - 11:10am
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:40am

Overview of 2018 Cyanobacteria Blooms in Utah
Overview of 2018 Cyanobacteria Blooms in Utah

This discussion will provide an overview of the harmful cyanobacteria bloom events observed across Utah during the 2018 recreation season. Specifically, it will review UDWQ's HAB Program, cover the sample results of these bloom events, and discuss the coordination and communication processes recently implemented.

Full Abstract
This discussion will provide an overview of the harmful cyanobacteria bloom events observed across Utah during the 2018 recreation season. Specifically, it will review UDWQ's HAB Program, cover the sample results of these bloom events, and discuss the coordination and communication processes recently implemented.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Holcomb

Ben Holcomb

Biological Assessment & Harmful Algal Bloom Programs Coordinator, Utah Water Quality Division
Ben Holcomb is the UT Division of Water Quality Coordinator for the Biological Assessment and Harmful Algal Bloom Programs. He's worked at UT DWQ for ten years and his past work includes salmon restoration, water quality, and tribal sovereignty in the Pacific NW.



Wednesday November 14, 2018 10:40am - 11:10am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

11:20am

Water Quality Data Collection, Management & Sharing in GIS
Water Quality Data Collection, Management & Sharing in GIS

Learn how to streamline your water quality sampling effort from start to finish using GIS. This presentation will show you how to configure your geodatabase, build sample collection survey’s, and host the data for public consumption. Improving your sampling workflow will help you better leverage your data and illustrate the story it tells.

Full Abstract
Organizations conducting a regular water quality sampling regimen can accumulate lots of data quickly. Managing this sampling regimen can be extremely time-consuming. An effective data management solution saves time and improves data quality by coordinating sampling effort, processing, and reporting procedures. The Salt Lake County Watershed Planning and Restoration program has completely overhauled their sampling initiative by leveraging their existing ESRI enterprise geodatabase and augmenting data collection/review using a Survey123 mobile collection application. Storing sample data in the geodatabase allows data sharing services to be published and hosted on websites making them available to the public. Previously sample data was collected on paper forms and then reentered into a standalone Access database. Access databases have limited functionality compared to today’s data models and data requests frequently required manual query and exports into different formats. This new GIS-based solution has eliminated dual entry and the published data services put all the data at the end user’s fingertips in a variety of formats.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Rudowski

Alex Rudowski

GIS Specialist, Salt Lake County Flood Control Engineering
I was born and raised in the rolling hills of Pennsylvania's Susquehanna lowlands. As a geographer, I've always been fascinated by human interaction with space and place. Displaying data in spatial terms increases our understanding of these interactions and helps us make better decisions... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 11:20am - 11:50am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

11:20am

Harmful Algal Blooms in Utah Lake: A Molecular Insight
Harmful Algal Blooms in Utah Lake: A Molecular Insight

Summary:
Our molecular analysis found that Aphanizomenon flos-aquae succeeded Synechococcus as the dominated species during the time of bloom. However, the piccocynaobacteria Synechococcus was the dominant species during non-bloom periods. This research supports that the cyanobacterial community composition in Utah Lake is very complex.

Full Abstract:
With climate change and population increase, harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been exacerbated in many freshwater ecosystems. Among all, the shallow Utah Lake has been experiencing extreme algal blooms in the summer in recent years, with the detected cyanobacterial numbers have gone up to 36 million cells per mL. Supported by USEPA STAR Grant, we conducted a holistic study of the lake in the summer of 2016 and 2017 by sampling both water and sediments on physical/chemical characteristics as well as overall microbial communities. In 2018, we also sampled seven sites across the lake from May to September at a monthly basis. The aim was to identify the microbial community composition and function change before, during and after the bloom. To accomplish the purposes, we sampled both depth integrated surface water and surface sediment at each sampling site and date. To understand more about cyanobacterial vertical movement, water samples from the surface, mid-depth and bottom of the lake, were collected from some of the sites. Water quality parameters, such as temperature, pH, conductivity and nutrients (ammonia-N, nitrate-N, nitrite-N, ortho-P, TP, TN, cBOD and heavy metals) were measured in-situ or at the U. High-throughput sequencing were applied as previously to measure the microbial community composition and diversity. Cyanotoxins (mostly microcystis) were measured using HPLC. Moreover, the expression of genes related to toxin production were quantified by real-time PCR. The linkages among water parameters, microbial community, cyanotoxin production and functional genes were further clarified from our study. We found that Aphanizomenon flos-aquae succeeded Synechococcus as the dominated species during the time of bloom. Heterotrophic bacteria were found to be negatively correlated with cyanobacterial communities. The presence of inorganic nitrogen source favored more for heterotrophs than cyanobacteria. Some heterotrophic strains (e.g. Flavobacterium) were found to scavenge on algal exudes and may be responsible for the removal of cyanotoxins. As for sediment, the minerology and P speciation results suggested that sediment was rich in calcite and more than 50% of TP was calcite-bound. Bloom-forming cyanobacteria were also detected from surface sediment due to decay or migrations. This research not only supports the notion that the cyanobacterial community composition in Utah Lake is more complex than revealed through microscopic techniques but also emphasizes the importance of internal cycling of nutrients in supporting HABs. Eventually, these results will be able to determine the ecosystem tipping point of Utah Lake.

Speakers
RG

Ramesh Goel

Professor, U of Utah
Dr. Ramesh Goel is a professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. He researches in nutrient management in municipal wastewater treatment plants, surface water quality, environmental microbiology, virology.



Wednesday November 14, 2018 11:20am - 12:00pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

11:50am

Lunch
Wednesday November 14, 2018 11:50am - 12:50pm
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

12:50pm

Poster Session
The poster session is a forum for presenters from around the world to highlight programs and to share successful ideas with colleagues by presenting a research study, a practical problem-solving effort, an innovative program, and more. Poster presentations provide other conference participants an opportunity to quickly and easily become acquainted with a variety of topics.

Check the POSTERS tab to learn more about the presenters!


Wednesday November 14, 2018 12:50pm - 1:40pm
Great Hall Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

1:40pm

Misrepresenting the Water Cycle in Educational Literature
Misrepresenting the Water Cycle in Educational Literature

We compared 464 diagrams of the water cycle from peer-reviewed articles, textbooks, and online sources in 12 countries, and determined the vast majority of the water cycle depictions inaccurately represented the affect of humans on the water cycle, along climate change and pollution's effects on the global water crisis.

Full Abstract
Increasing human water demand and large-scale human interference with the water cycle have created a global crisis of water quality and quantity. To assess recent advances in our understanding of the water cycle, we compiled over 50 modelled and empirical studies of global water pools and fluxes, including human use. We compared this new synthesis of the global water cycle with 464 diagrams of the water cycle from peer-reviewed articles, textbooks, and online sources in 12 countries. Human consumptive water use ranged from 3,800 to 5,000 km^3 yr^-1, brushing up dangerously to estimates of accessible and sustainable water resources 5,000 to 9,000 km^3 yr ^-1), and total human water appropriation (green, blue, and gray water use) equaled 23,400 km^3 yr^-1, the equivalent of half the water transported from ocean to land by the atmosphere. Despite this large human water footprint, humans were depicted interacting with the water cycle in only 15% of diagrams overall, and in less than 5% of diagrams from China, the USA, and Australia. Additionally, climate change and water pollution, two of the dominant causes of the global water crisis, were depicted in less than 2% of diagrams globally. As a first step toward improving understanding of the water cycle and fostering planetary thinking in the Anthropocene, we present a new diagram of the global water cycle based on new estimates of global water pools and fluxes and recent advances in understanding of human interactions with the global water cycle.

We believe this presentation (based on a paper in review) will be of great interest to audience members for two main reasons:
  1. Our synthesis of water pools and fluxes in the Anthropocene is the most complete to date and the first to integrate all types of human water use and interference at a global scale. It will serve as a reference for researchers from all disciplines and because we present our water cycle estimates in a professionally produced diagram, and we offer real solutions for how to teach the water cycle and depict it in educational literature. 
  2. The analysis of water cycle diagrams across disciplines and countries demonstrates widespread inaccuracies that correspond directly with mismanagement of water in the Anthropocene. This presentation identifies the causes of these misconceptions and maps a path towards sustainable water management in the face of growing human pressure.

Speakers
avatar for Madeline Buhman

Madeline Buhman

Research Assistant, Brigham Young University
Madeline Buhman is a Senior at Brigham Young University studying Environmental Science and English. She currently works for Ben Abbott in his lab of ecosystem ecology, and after her graduation she hopes to pursue a PhD in Environmental Science. Specifically Madeline is interested... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

1:40pm

Surface Temperature of Alpine Lakes of Wasatch and Uinta
Surface Temperature of Alpine Lakes of Wasatch and Uinta

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) could severely impact the water quality and ecosystems of freshwater lakes. Using remote sensing and field samples, we are monitoring the water quality of alpine lakes in Uinta and Wasatch.

Full Abstract
Alpine lakes (lakes located at elevations above 3000 meters) are some of the less studied ecosystems in the world. This is partially related to their location and accessibility. Therefore, the common perception is that they must be pristine (healthy) ecosystems. Recent events, however, have changed this view. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) which are toxic to both lake inhabitants and humans have been reported from a handful of alpine lakes. While climate change and urban/agricultural development have been accounted responsible for HAB events in lower elevation lakes, the origin of HAB events in alpine lakes remains unclear. During the summer of 2018, we established multiple pilot sites at various alpine lakes in Ashley National Forest and Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. We collected biweekly and monthly biological and physical samples from these lakes and deployed sensors for yearlong continuous measurements of water quality parameters. The long-term goal of this multiyear project is to determine the role of climate change in recent increase in frequency of HABs in alpine lakes.

Speakers
avatar for Foad Yousef

Foad Yousef

Assistant Professor, Westminster College
I love lakes, their inhabitants, and the physical and chemical interactions in them. The book by Marten Scheffer, Ecology of Shallow Lakes, got me very interested in pursuing further education in the field of limnology and lake ecology. I also have a keen interest in satellite imagery... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

2:20pm

Plants to the Rescue: Activities and Models for Stormwater Education
Plants to the Rescue: Activities and Models for Stormwater Education

USU’s Water Quality Extension program has developed several activities and models that demonstrate the increases in impervious surfaces, as well as practices that can prevent or mitigate these impacts. Two of these will be highlighted in this presentation.

Full Abstract
As Salt Lake City and its surrounded area develops, urban stormwater runoff is of increasing concern. Increases in impervious surface areas reduce infiltration of storm runoff, resulting in deterioration of the quality of receiving waters. Changes in stream hydrology as a result of urbanization may also be significant, ranging from more frequent and severe flooding to loss of summer baseflows. USU’s Water Quality Extension program has developed several activities and models that demonstrate these impacts, as well as practices that can prevent or mitigate these impacts. Two of these will be highlighted in this presentation. Pave It or Plant It is an educational activity in which students simulate rainfall on different types of watersheds, measure the runoff, and then compare calculated hydrologic variables. The activity is easy to modify, challenges students to collect and use actual data, and provides linkages to real-world applications and settings. We will also discuss a demonstration green roof display built along a busy walkway on USU’s campus that compares the runoff from a traditional asphalt roof and a sedum-covered green roof. Scheduled “rain events” provided by sprinklers occur throughout the day. The runoff is collected in gutters and directed through tipping buckets, to demonstrate the timing, rate, and volume of runoff from these side by side treatments. We have also measured and compared runoff temperatures from these two treatments. Interpretive signs and graphs help explain the impacts of urbanization and the benefits of green roofs, even in a dry state such as Utah.

Many authors contributed to the development of these activities: McKenna Drew, John Saunders, Tim Beach, Summer Hansen, Zach Hulsey, Audree Van Valkenburg, Cole Patton, Hannah Johnson, Cade Andrus, Dr. Bo Yang, Dr. Mark Brunson and Nancy Mesner.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Bailey

Ellen Bailey

Program Coordinator, Utah State University Water Quality Extension
Ellen Bailey has a BS in Biology from University of Dayton and an MS from University of Florida in Soil and Water Science. She worked 9 years as and Environmental Scientist for the St. Johns River Water Management District, a state agency, doing field work on lakes and wetlands in... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 2:20pm - 2:50pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

2:20pm

What Happens to Cyanotoxins Once They Are Out?
What Happens to Cyanotoxins Once They Are Out?

Cyanotoxins can affect ecosystem adversely once the blooms have formed. The bacterial population, especially participating in nitrogen and carbon cycling can be affected negatively. We report very interesting findings with nitrogen cycling bacteria as model organisms. This research is novel and has very high intellectual merit.

Full Abstract
During the last few decades, algal blooms have become a prevalent problem in many lake ecosystems. Cyanotoxins, a cyanobacterial metabolite, are responsible for harmfully impacting both the environment and human health. To measure cyanotoxin influence within nitrifying microbial communities, ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were examined after their exposure to the cyanotoxin microcystin-LR (MC-LR). The various microcystin toxins are commonly occurring in freshwater environments relative to other cyanotoxin strains. Likewise, the range of MC-LR concentrations used in the experiments, 0.25 µg/l to 10 µg/L, reflect surface water microcystin concentrations in natural water sources. Various forms of nitrification and oxygen uptake experiments were completed. NH4-N and NO2-N concentrations were promptly measured after the nitrification kinetics experiments to determine cyanotoxin impact on nitrogen transformations. The nitrification kinetics experiment demonstrated MC-LR’s ability to prevent NH4-N oxidation to NO2-N for the three hour experimental time span. Additionally, the MC-LR infused samples temporarily experienced a rise in NH4-N concentration in the samples containing the highest concentration of MC-LR, 10 µg/L. The inhibition kinetics experiment established MC-LR inhibits oxygen depletion for nitrifying bacteria biomass in a feed solution when the MC-LR concentration exceeds 1 µg/L. Finally, a gene expression analysis was conducted to address MC-LR influence on the genomic level. The cyanotoxins’ amoA gene was evaluated to determine its expression rate while the 16s rRNA gene was utilized as the endogenous control. As the samples and blanks both experienced the gene expression procedure the MC-LR inhibited the amoA gene expression comparable to the blanks.

Speakers
MH

Marielle Hollstein

Senior Undergraduate Student, University of Utah
Marielle is Senior Undergraduate Honors student. This research forms the basis of her honors research project.
HL

Hanyan Li

Graduate Student, University of Utah
Hanyan is Doctoral student researching on surface water quality of Utah Lake funded by USEPA.



Wednesday November 14, 2018 2:20pm - 2:50pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

2:50pm

Break, snacks, and prize drawing!
Look for the "big ticket" signs for places to get raffle tickets! Visit exhibitor tables, and more. Prizes will be raffled off during this break. Woohoo!


Wednesday November 14, 2018 2:50pm - 3:20pm
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

3:20pm

Green Streets: Improving Water Quality and Increasing Conservation
Green Streets: Improving Water Quality and Increasing Conservation

Green streets offer a great opportunity to get multiple benefits out of critical infrastructure. Green streets can be incorporated into street capital improvement plans to reduce overall costs and increased benefits.

Full Abstract
Green streets offer a great opportunity to get multiple benefits out of critical infrastructure. Coordination of green street development to strategically fit into capital improvement programs for both streets and water quality infrastructure is a cost efficient way to improve water quality, improve street aesthetics, and increase water conservation by recharging aquifers. Developing a systematic approach for adding green streets to a capital improvement program requires assessing which streets require repair, determining the potential of the street locations for groundwater recharge, developing standard plans and approaches that are acceptable to the road maintenance and construction groups, and determining funding sources for the various aspects of the project. Green streets can range in construction from traditional streets with inlets for median bioswales, pervious pavements or pavers that allow direct infiltration, capture and irrigation reuse systems, street planter box systems for improved water quality, etc... Design of green streets can be flexible enough to meet the specific requirements of any agency. This presentation provides discussion on a systematic analysis approach for determining which streets are candidates for green street approaches in a CIP. The approach was used to successfully develop planning level maps ranking potential green streets within two watersheds. Examples of green streets that have recently been developed in several cities in Southern California will be discussed to show the versatility of the green street concepts and stimulate ideas.

City of Los Angeles Laurel Canyon Boulevard Green Street – This project included sidewalk improvements and bioswales along 1,300 linear feet of Laurel Canyon Boulevard for LA Sanitation – City of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Conservation Corps. The project provides increased groundwater recharge, reduces flooding impacts, protects compatible beneficial uses, and improves the neighborhood quality of life. The project collects stormwater runoff from an approximately 120-acre drainage area.

City of Los Angeles University Park Rain Gardens - CWE designed standardized sidewalk planters (rain gardens) to treat stormwater runoff to help address the Santa Monica Bay Beaches Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The stormwater planters qualify as Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Low Impact Development (LID) solutions. The project involved demolition and reconstruction of parkways, curbs, and gutters so the planters could be constructed within the public right-of-way.

City of Claremont Foothill Boulevard Master Plan Implementation – The master plan implementation included storm drains, bioswales, and water quality systems and structures over a 2.5-mile stretch of roadway as part of the Foothill Boulevard Master Plan. These improvements included approximately 1,000 feet of new storm drain, minor roadway and intersection improvements, pedestrian improvements, restriping, infill sidewalks, minor lighting improvements, bicycle lanes and protected bicycle lanes, turf removal and drought-tolerant landscaping installation in medians and some parkway areas, bioswales, and stormwater percolation devices.

Speakers
VB

Vik Bapna

Principal, CWE
Vik Bapna is a recognized expert managing multiuse projects that improve water quality, reduce pollutants of concern, and enhance local communities. Vik has 27 years of experience in the planning, design, and construction of more than $200 million worth of civil engineering projects... Read More →
SB

Steve Bell

Civil Engineer, CWE
Steve is a professional engineer with 11 years of experience. He has provided project management, developed erosion control and project-specific construction plans, and prepared technical reports on behalf of private, state, local, and tribal clients to achieve compliance with regulations... Read More →
avatar for Ben Willardson

Ben Willardson

Director of Water Resources, CWE
Dr. Ben Willardson is CWE’s Director of Water Resources. He has been heavily involved in the implementation of stormwater management programs for compliance with NPDES Permit requirements and has guided the development of methodologies to evaluate the effective use of BMPs. His... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

3:20pm

Phosphorous, Grazers, and Temperatures May Intensify Utah Lake HABs
Phosphorous, Grazers, and Temperatures May Intensify Utah Lake HABs

Our results indicate that HAB contributors are triggered by more biologically available phosphorus and higher temperatures that stimulate Eukaryotic grazer populations. Further, we observed that the most dominant HAB species, Aphanizomenon, had no identifiable triggers but was so prolific that its growth ultimately curtailed its own bloom.

Full Abstract
The inception and persistence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) is linked to the appropriate conditions for a given cyanobacteria to break dormancy and become abundant. Certain cyanobacterial species may exploit natural and anthropogenic nutrients, such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), thrive under seasonal fluctuations in meteorological and physicochemical lake conditions, and/or escape predation of eukaryotic grazers to grow and potentially produce cyanotoxins. To identify specific environmental cues or conditions promoting individual HAB species, we tracked shifts in abundance of major cyanobacterial species in response to fluctuations in nutrient availability, top-down grazer pressure, and atmospheric and lake chemistry weekly through the spring and summer (May 5th – Oct 10th) of 2017 across three locations (mouth of Goshen Bay and Provo Bay, and 1 mile west of Vineyard) in Utah Lake, UT, USA. We found that 11 cyanobacterial operational taxonomic units or species across five genera (Aphanizomenon, Anabaena, Synechococcus, Microcystis, Planktothrix) contributed to three to six HABs, depending on location, constituting anywhere from 4% to almost 50% of the total bacterial community in surface waters. Based on linear mixed effects models, HAB contributors were triggered by species-specific interactions with light availability, total P (TP), total dissolved P (TDP), soluble reactive P (SRP), water temperature, and three grazers (Genus: Copepoda, Cyclopoida, and Diplostraca). For example, Synechococcus sp., a microcystin-producing picoplankton, which was only second in abundance to Aphanizomenon in HABs, was positively related to SRP and temperature (R2=0.35, F value=13, p-value<0.001). A HAB species of global concern and non-heterocystous former, Microcystis, was negatively related to total P (TP), but positively related to total dissolve P (TDP) demonstrating that the movement of P between occluded and available forms may structure its blooms (R2=0.18, F value=5.3, p-value=0.008). Similarly, Planktothrix, was also positively related to more available forms of P, SRP, and its growth potentially stimulated Copepoda grazing (R2=0.35, F value=5.7, p-value=0.003). Alternatively, Aphanizomenon sp., the most abundant bloom species, was negatively related to higher light penetration and positively related to total organic carbon (C) and Cyclopoida grazers, suggesting that Aphanizomenon altered physical, nutrient, and grazer characteristics; was insensitive to lake conditions; and potentially created a negative feedback causing its bloom to decline (R2=0.31, F value=4.8, p-value=0.007). Our results indicate that HAB contributors are triggered by more biologically available phosphorus and higher temperatures that stimulate eukaryotic grazer populations. Further, we observed that the most dominant HAB species, Aphanizomenon, had no identifiable triggers but was so prolific that its growth ultimately curtailed its own bloom.

Speakers
SC

Scott Collins

Research Student, BYU
Scott Collins is from Manassas, Virginia. He completed his undergrad at BYU in Environmental Science with minors in Business and Italian. He is currently pursuing a Master's degree in Environmental Science at BYU. After finishing his Master's degree he will pursue a career in Water... Read More →
EJ

Erin Jones

Research Assistant, Brigham Young University
Erin Jones has a BS in Fisheries and Aquatic sciences from Utah State University and is currently a PhD candidate at Brigham Young University in the Plant and Wildlife sciences department.



Wednesday November 14, 2018 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

4:00pm

EBPR: A Solution to Nutrient Removal and Environmental Protection
EBPR: A Solution to Nutrient Removal and Environmental Protection

Exponential growth in population and agricultural use of phosphorus (P) nutrient rich fertilizers has drastically reduced this limited resource. Excess P in surface waters from anthropogenic activities has been linked to eutrophication and harmful algae blooms. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is an economically viable solution to remedy these emerging environmental concerns.

Full Abstract
With the turn of 19th century agricultural use of nutrient rich fertilizer to meet population growth and food consumption demand has drastically increased. Anthropogenic activities have contaminated surface water with excess nutrients through storm water runoff and other point source contributions. These excess nutrients have been linked to environmental derogation in the form of eutrophication and harmful algae blooms. In response researchers and legislators have studied possible solutions to remediating these emerging contaminates in an economical and efficient way. On January 1, 2020 Utah will act with Rule R317-1-3.3, a technology-based limit of total phosphorus effluents (TBPEL). Effluent discharge concentrations from wastewater treatment facilities will be regulated to less than or equal to the annual mean of 1 mg/L. Since the late 1970s enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) reactors have operated a series of anoxic/anaerobic/aerobic environmental conditions all over the world with great nutrient removal success. Phosphorus is removed in the wasted biomass of phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) who consume soluble phosphorus and use an energy resource for proliferation. PAOs compete with denitrifying bacteria, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and other heterotrophic organisms for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and other carbon resource. Additional carbon sources can be generated from the fermentation of primary settled sludge (PS) and or recycled activation sludge (RAS) to combat resource limitations. Funded by Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF) the University of Utah is operating a bench top EPBR reactor with fermentation. Microbial diversity is being monitored for PAOs, with particularly attention on Tetrasphera. Tetrasphera ability to accumulate phosphorus while also carrying out glycogen fermentation and denitrification makes Tetrasphera a desirable microorganism for EBPR. EBPR with fermentation is an economical and effective solution to nutrient removal for industrial and municipal wastewater discharges. The removal of P from our wastewater effluent discharges is of vital importance, because P is a limited resource that is being depleted at exponential rates. Scientist have estimated that apatite ores, the natural phosphorus deposit, will only endure current consumption rates for the next 50-130 years. The P rich biomass from the EBPR removal process can in turn be used as fertilizer, which will considerably conserve P resources since 82% of the mined phosphorus is used for agriculture.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Mackey

Brendan Mackey

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Utah Civil and Environmental Engineering
In the years proceeding graduating from University of Pittsburgh with an undergraduate degree in business marketing and economics, I found my career opportunities unfulfilling. In 2014 I switched career focuses towards nonprofit organizations, with the hopes that helping others would... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

4:00pm

Retrofitting Stormwater Ponds To Improve Water Quality & Flood Control
Retrofitting Stormwater Ponds To Improve Water Quality & Flood Control

Why build additional treatment and flood control basins at significant cost, when simple, inexpensive modifications to existing basins may achieve your water quality, flood control, and reuse goals. Often simple and relatively inexpensive modifications can be employed to achieve improved water quality treatment efficiency and added flood control.

Full Abstract
This presentation will describe ways to maintain and modify existing stormwater treatment basins and traditional flood control basins for improved water quality, added flood detention and stormwater reuse. Often simple and relatively inexpensive modifications can be employed to achieve water quality, flood control and reuse goals especially where available land is scarce or expensive. The presentation will include key design parameters and considerations for various features so designers will be able to use the information provided the next day.Targeted audience would include city and county public works directors, engineers, planners, water resource managers, and permit reviewers; consulting engineers; water management agencies; state and federal agencies; MS4 regulators; researchers and students.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Klein

Steven Klein

Vice President, PE, PH, P.Eng, Barr Engineering Co
Steve has 40 years of experience in stormwater and natural resources management, hydrologic and hydraulic analysis, and environmental assessment to municipalities, counties, soil and water conservation districts, watershed districts, water management organizations, state and federal... Read More →



Wednesday November 14, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119
 
Thursday, November 15
 

8:00am

Registration & Check-in
Check-in, grab your badge, and meet other attendees before we kick off Day 2!

Thursday November 15, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

8:30am

Opening Comments
Thursday November 15, 2018 8:30am - 8:40am
Great Hall Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

8:40am

Doing More with Less: Climate Change in the Colorado River Basin
Doing More with Less: Climate Change in the Colorado River Basin

With the advent of a warming climate, the Colorado River Basin is getting hotter and drier, thereby reducing water supplies to the American West. We explore the science and policy behind the expected regulatory action western communities may be forced to take through a Level I Shortage declaration expected in the next 18 months.

Full Abstract
The Colorado River Basin is home to some 30+ million people across 7 states who rely upon the river’s flows for farming, ranching, power production, drinking and landscape water and a variety of industrial use. But 7/8 of the water from the Colorado River originates in the snowy mountaintops that represent just 1/8 of this massive watershed’s land mass. For the last 15 years scientists studying trends in these snowpacks have been warning busy population centers downstream about a future of diminished snowpacks because of climate change. The cause of these flow reductions are twofold. The first and most prominent is that the jet stream that typically brings copious moisture from the Pacific Ocean to the West’s mountains is shifting north due to the increased warming of the Northern Polar relative to the equatorial region. This change has produced a Di-Pole weather system: dry conditions in the west, wet conditions in the east. This pattern has become more stagnant since 1980 and is forecast to become more intense as we warm our climate. The second aspect is the transition of our snow hydrology regime to that of a rain-driven hydrology. These two factors provide an uncertain future for the western states and their water supply. Unfortunately for Western economies, the day of prediction has arrived. In August 2018, the Bureau of Reclamation shocked the West with their official prediction that there was a 90% chance the Colorado River would drop to record low levels at Lake Mead, requiring a Level I Shortage Declaration on the Colorado River within the next 18 months. Several Lower Basin communities are now scrambling to figure out how to walk away from a portion of their Colorado River water supplies, what it means to their economies, and how much worse it may get in coming years. In this workshop we explore how science and policy are mixing together to spell a new future for Colorado River water supply and water policy. We will explore the crossroads western communities stand upon by showcasing how some communities have been embracing the science and adapting to climate change while others have ignored the science and are struggling about how to plan for tomorrow.

Speakers
ZF

Zachary Frankel

Executive Director, Utah Rivers Council
Zach Frankel received his B.S. in Biology at the University of Utah and is the Executive Director of the Utah Rivers Council, which he founded in 1994.
avatar for Brian McInerney

Brian McInerney

Senior Hydrologist, National Weather Service
Brian is the Senior Hydrologist at the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has worked at the National Weather Service for the past 28 years and holds a Masters Degree from the University of Montana. He is from Chicago, Illinois, and currently resides... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 8:40am - 9:15am
Great Hall Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

9:25am

Linking Water Quantity to Water Quality in the Jordan River, Utah
Linking Water Quantity to Water Quality in the Jordan River, Utah

Water quality in urban rivers is linked to both total discharge and the dominant source of water, which can vary with season and location along a river's flowpath. However, urban rivers are still capable of processing high nutrient loads with adequate hydrologic flow.

Full Abstract
Arid and semi-arid regions face increasing challenges for provisioning water for human consumption and ecosystem services under a changing climate and population growth. The role of urban water diversions and inputs on water quality in rivers remains poorly understood in many cities. We conducted synoptic surveys over three seasons in one year to evaluate the variability in water sources and geochemistry of an urban river with complex water infrastructure in the state of Utah, USA. Using stable isotopes of river water (δ18O and δ2H) within a Bayesian mixing model framework and a separate hydrologic mass balance approach, we quantified both the proportional inputs and magnitude of discharge associated with ‘natural’ (lake, groundwater, and tributary inputs) and ‘urban’ (effluent and canal inflows) sources. The relative importance of these major contributors to streamflow varied both spatially and seasonally. Spatio-temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, calcium, chloride, nitrate (NO3-N), and orthophosphate (PO4-P) indicated that seasonal shifts in dominant sources of river water played an important role in determining water quality. We show that although urban rivers are clearly influenced by novel water sources created by water infrastructure, they continue to reflect the imprint of ‘natural’ water sources, including diffuse groundwater. Analyses of changes to nutrient load in three sections of the river located between water reclamation facilities suggest the river is capable of processing up to 30% of NO3-N loads and over 50% of PO4-P loads, but this capacity is significantly diminished with major hydrologic diversion. In short, water quantity is linked to water quality through the magnitude of total discharge, as well as the dominant source from which water is derived.

Learning Objectives:
  1.  learn how stable isotopes and hydrologic mass balance models can be used in tandem to infer discharge from different water sources to urban rivers 
  2. describe relationships between variation in discharge from different water sources and variation in water quality parameters 
  3. assess biological and physical processing capacity through nutrient load analyses

Primary Author: Jennifer Follstad Shah

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Follstad Shah

Jennifer Follstad Shah

Assistant Professor, University of Utah
Jennifer Follstad Shah is an Assistant Professor (Lecturer) in the Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENVST) Program and Research Assistant Professor in Geography, both within the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Utah. She is a freshwater ecosystem... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 9:25am - 9:55am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

9:25am

Wetlands in the Watershed: Health, Stressors, Losses, and Function
Wetlands in the Watershed: Health, Stressors, Losses, and Function

The Utah Geological Survey recently completed a field study and landscape analysis of wetlands in the Jordan River watershed. This talk will discuss the condition, common stressors, and estimated losses of wetlands in Salt Lake County as well as some of the important functions that these wetlands provide.

Full Abstract
Wetlands play a vital and sometimes unseen role in protecting the quality of life of people living in Salt Lake County. The Utah Geological Survey recently completed a field study and landscape analysis of wetlands in the Jordan River watershed. Most of the wetlands surveyed for this project in the County were in the Great Salt Lake and Wasatch Front regions, which will be the focus of this talk. Common threats to wetlands in this region include water quality stressors, hydrologic alteration, and non-native plant species. Wetlands frequently receive water from sources impacted by development runoff and point source discharge and, in the Wasatch Front, half of all wetlands receive direct stormwater inputs. Hydrology at most Great Salt Lake wetlands is controlled by management practices via impoundments, ditches, and control structures, either directly within impoundments or indirectly due to overflow or release from impoundments whereas Wasatch Front wetlands are less directly managed, but still altered through ditching, berms, and impervious surface. Noxious weeds are very abundant in wetlands in the County, covering almost 25% of Great Salt Lake and over one-third of Wasatch Front wetlands, which much of the cover from the aggressive grass species Phragmites australis (common reed). Despite these stressors, wetlands in the region provide many important functions. Almost all the studied wetlands likely play a role in helping improve water quality. Wetlands also provide important habitat not only for migratory and nesting birds in the world-renowned Great Salt Lake wetlands, but also for birds along the Wasatch Front and for a diversity of mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and fish. Wetlands also support recreational opportunities such as hunting and bird watching and provide a scenic backdrop for people out recreating. Landscape analysis shows a large change in wetland area from when wetlands were originally mapped in the region, which occurred primarily in 1998. Only 46% of the area mapped as wetlands in the older spatial data from the Wasatch Front appears to be wetlands today; about one-third of the mapped wetlands have been replaced by development. Losses around Great Salt Lake were smaller by percentage (~13%), but much larger in terms of total area (~5600 acres). However, it is unclear how much of the change is due to changes in aerial imagery interpretation, hydrologic alterations, or other alterations; little of the change around Great Salt Lake could be attributed to development.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Menuz

Diane Menuz

State Wetlands Coordinator, Utah Geological Survey
Diane Menuz is the State Wetlands Coordinator with the Utah Geological Survey and has been conducting research on wetlands in Utah for the past five years with a focus on wetland vegetation and rapid assessment methods for evaluating wetland condition and function. She has a Master’s... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 9:25am - 9:55am
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:05am

The Great Depression, The Dust Bowl and Utah's wetlands: A Story
The Great Depression, The Dust Bowl and Utah's wetlands: A Story
Presentation file
The wetlands around Great Salt Lake have a rich history behind them. This talk goes over bits and pieces of their history and highlights their significance in the past, the present and the future.

Full Abstract
The wetlands surrounding Great Salt Lake have been heavily influenced by humans. As the pioneers began to arrive in Utah, they created aqueducts and canals to divert water to where they needed it. Agriculture was booming in Utah and all over the U.S. with little to no regard for water conservation. The result of this was the creation of the Dust Bowl, which also affected Utah. The issue became so bad that FDR created the CCC to help mitigate the damage done and also to help restore America's wildlife. This story helps to tie these events to the wetlands surrounding Great Salt Lake.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Kijowski

Ashley Kijowski

Wildlife Biologist II, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
Ashley Kijowski is a Wildlife Biologist at the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program (GSLEP) within the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR). Here she develops research questions, prepares study design and conducts research in regards to the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. The focus... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 10:05am - 10:35am
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:05am

Water Use By Lawns and Other Landscapes of Salt Lake Valley
Water Use By Lawns and Other Landscapes of Salt Lake Valley

We are measuring in situ evapotranspiration rates of well- watered lawns, and turfgrass alternative species in collaboration with Red Butte Garden and Research Park.

Full Abstract
As the population and urban water demand in the Salt Lake Valley continue to grow, outdoor water use is a growing target for conservation measures. Many property owners choose to ‘xeriscape’ their lawns, replacing turfgrass with a variety of plant species and mulch in order to reduce irrigation. While metering studies have demonstrated that turfgrass removal results in reduced water demand on average, turfgrass replacements can vary widely in their form, plant cover, and species present. There is a need for more accurate information about in situ water use (evapotranspiration, ET) rates in heterogeneous urban landscapes in order to predict water demand and adequately inform planning efforts. In collaboration with Red Butte Gardens, and the University of Utah Research Park, we are conducting a study on in situ ET of various species used in landscaping across Salt Lake City. We measured in situ ET rates on a well-watered Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis) lawn, as well as four turfgrass alternative species found in the ‘Water Conservation Garden’ at Red Butte Gardens. These species (Thymus lanuginosus, Veronica oltensis, Sedum spurium, and Bouteloua dactyloides) are also currently well-watered. In situ ET measurements involves briefly placing a portable clear PVC chamber (0.28 x 0.28 x 0.19m) over an individual plant, or patch of lawn and measuring changes in relative humidity within the chamber. We measured each species between 6 and 10 times between sunrise and sunset during 2-3 days in Summer and Fall, 2018, and used a loess smoothing and integration algorithm to calculate daily rates. Chamber measurements were calibrated based on previous measurements on urban lawns in California, although additional calibration is ongoing. Preliminary daily ET rates measured on August 3 and 6, 2018 were variable among Kentucky Bluegrass and turfgrass alternative species. Kentucky Bluegrass ET was 11.2 mm/d on average across five replicate sunny locations on this day, and 3.9 mm/d on average across 5 shaded sites. ET for the four turfgrass-alternative species, all in full sun, ranged from 4.1 to 9.8 mm/day. Several of the turfgrass alternative species do not fully cover the ground, so ET rates measured with the chamber method represent an under-estimate leaf-level transpiration and over-estimate landscape-scale ET. While additional measurements and comparisons with existing ET models, and scaling efforts are ongoing, our preliminary results suggest that species commonly used in ‘water wise’ landscaping are quite variable under well-watered conditions.

Speakers
RS

Rose Smith

Research Assistant Professor, University of Utah
Rose is a research professor at the U of Utah, interested in the intersections among urban infrastructure, hydrology, nutrient cycling.



Thursday November 15, 2018 10:05am - 10:35am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:35am

Break and snacks
Look for the "big ticket" signs for places to get raffle tickets!  By visiting exhibitor tables, and more. Prizes will be raffled off during the afternoon "finale" break.


Thursday November 15, 2018 10:35am - 10:55am
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:55am

Jordan River Water Quality Modeling: Application and Simulations
Jordan River Water Quality Modeling: Application and Simulations

The Jordan River system exhibits significant portions that have been indicated as impaired for different water quality constituents. Consequently, the goal of this study involves evaluating the water quality performance and studies of the Jordan River under existing and futuristic conditions, incorporating land use and climate change projections.

Full Abstract
Significant portions of the Jordan River system are indicated as impaired for different water quality constituents under the “Utah’s 2016 Integrated Report”. At the same time, while previous models have been developed for remediating such impairment, involving the Qual2K Steady-State TMDL February 2007 and August 2009 Models for the Jordan River, further analyses appear needed for investigating the water quantity and quality performance of the Jordan River under existing and futuristic conditions. For this exercise, a major water resources model framework has been developed for investigating the water quantity and quality characteristics of the Jordan River system subject to historical and futuristic development, environmental, and climatic projections. This framework involves DHSVM (Distributed Hydrologic Soil-Vegetation Model) for simulating the non-urban characteristics of the Jordan River Watershed, the SWMM and GoldSim models for simulating the stormwater and urban water quality/quantity of the Jordan River Watershed, and then the WASP (Water Quality Assessment Simulation Program) models for simulating the water quality characteristics of the Jordan River. Under this framework, several simulations are planned for investigating the water quality performance of the Jordan River subject to existing and futuristic climate change projections that are represented by the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) followed by existing and futuristic land use/development scenarios. Such simulations, involving the historical baseline period followed by a futuristic period, provide insight regarding the water quality performance of the Jordan River, with analyses over identifying potential water quality impairment along the system. The objective of this presentation involves discussing the motivation and fundamentals of the Jordan River water quality model (WASP), along with the model setup, water quality constituents simulated, calibration approaches, calibration periods, and the historical baseline/future simulations planned for the project. The presentation first involves general description of the water quality standards for selected water quality constituents by the State of Utah, including discussions of the Jordan River impairment (locations of impairment, constituent impaired, etc.). Then, previous model development, particularly for the WASP Jordan River models, for the Jordan River are assessed, which sensitivity analyses and the calibration approaches, along with analyses of the measured water quality data. This presentation then describes the application of such previous Jordan River model development, which serve as the basis for the extended historical and futuristic simulations planned for the project/research work.

Speakers
JS

Juhn-Yuan Su

Ph.D. Student/Graduate Research Assistant, University of Utah
Juhn-Yuan Su began his Ph.D. Career/Research at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah in June 2016 under the supervision of Dr. Michael E. Barber. He has earned his Bachelor’s of Science (B.S.) in Civil Engineering from the University of... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 10:55am - 11:25am
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

10:55am

The Great Reduction: How We Can Save the “Polar Bears” of the GSL
The Great Reduction: How We Can Save the “Polar Bears” of the GSL

The Great Salt Lake is home to the world’s second largest white pelican rookery, where these charismatic “polar bears” of the Lake face a crisis as lake levels drop. These peli-canaries in the coalmine face a cascade of impacts, but water conservation is being ignored as a viable solution to keep water flowing to the Lake, and time is running out.

Full Abstract
The Great Salt Lake has been called America’s Serengeti for birds. The Lake’s unprecedented diversity of habitats are vital for 8-10 million individual migratory birds with many species gathering at the Lake in larger populations than anywhere else on the planet. According to biologists the Lake is less than half its average volume. Upstream water diversions are a big part of this decline, as are increased air temperatures, which reduce snowpack and annual runoff patterns. A massive new proposed diversion of the Lake’s largest water source, the Bear River, would exacerbate these problems. It’s clear that humans are pushing the Lake closer and closer to disaster. Nowhere is this more apparent than on the secluded outpost of Gunnison Island, which hosts the world’s second largest white pelican rookery, with an average of 11,000 birds and 5,000 nests. These charismatic “polar bears” of the Great Salt Lake face a crisis as lake levels drop, and the birds’ island refuge where they raise their chicks becomes accessible. Recently Lake levels dropped low enough that the island was no longer surrounded by water allowing coyotes, humans and other predators to use the land bridge to invade this pelican sanctuary. These pelicans are the canaries in the coalmine; because as lake levels drop there will be a cascade of impacts on the ecosystem from the increased salinity, land bridges, and different invertebrate assemblage. Water conservation is largely being ignored as a viable solution to the Lake’s woes. Because urban Utahns use more water per-person than nearly everybody in the U.S., significant reductions in water use could put Utah on path to a sustainable water future and save the Lake from disaster. If Wasatch Front residents simply reduced their water use to that of scores of other western U.S. communities, it would require less water to be diverted out of the rivers that feed the Great Salt Lake. The solution is simple and obtainable, but time is running out.

Speakers
JB

Jaimi Butler

Coordinator of Great Salt Lake Institute, Great Salt Lake Institute
Jaimi Butler is the coordinator of the Great Salt Lake Institute, housed at Westminster College. Despite the Great Salt Lakes’ reputation for being inhospitable, Jaimi fell in love with the lake and made it her place. After graduating with her Fisheries and Wildlife degree from... Read More →
NS

Nick Schou

Conservation Director, Utah Rivers Council
Nick Schou has a M.S. in Environmental Humanities from the University of Utah, a B.A. in History from Westminster College. Nick spent 5 years working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in remote river canyons to restore endangered native fish species of the Colorado River. Nick... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 10:55am - 11:25am
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

11:35am

What Should the Water Quality Goals for Great Salt Lake Wetlands Be?
What Should the Water Quality Goals for Great Salt Lake Wetlands Be?

GSL experts provided UDWQ with info on what GSL wetlands look like in good and poor condition and the threats to wetlands. This info will be used to create water quality standards for GSL wetlands.

Full Abstract
The Utah Division of Water Quality (UDWQ) has been working to develop water quality standards for the wetlands of Great Salt Lake. Specifically we need to define a beneficial use (what the water is used for) that captures the most important parts of the wetland ecosystem and narrative standard criteria (what is and is not allowed in the water) that best protects wetlands. Determining the appropriate water quality goals for any wetland is difficult because water quality changes naturally throughout the year, which makes it challenging to detect poor conditions caused by human activities. Great Salt Lake wetlands are even more challenging to protect because of complex environmental gradients (especially salinity and flooding), extensive management activities, and complicated water sources. UDWQ conducted Conservation Action Planning (CAP) meetings to draw on the knowledge of a wide variety of experts that helped us understand the most important characteristics of our wetlands, the best indicators of wetland health, threats to wetlands, and strategies for protecting them. Participants in CAP meetings were experts in a broad range of topics, from birds to chemistry. In the meetings participants refined definitions of the most important ecosystem types – impounded, fringe, and playa/mudflat wetlands – and the birds that used the wetlands. Once those were defined, the meetings focused on what wetland features, from water depth to what plant species are growing, that best showed whether a wetland was in good or poor health. Finally, participants identified the biggest threats to wetlands – drought and invasive species – and came up with strategies for protecting wetlands against those threats. UDWQ will take the results of the meetings and other research into account as we come up with goals for GSL wetlands.

Speakers
BD

Becka Downard

Wetland Coordinator, Utah Division of Water Quality
Becka Downard has been the Wetland Coordinator for the Utah Division of Water Quality since 2016. Currently that work involves helping to develop water quality standards for the wetlands around Great Salt Lake. She received a PhD in Ecology from Utah State University, where she spent... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 11:35am - 12:05pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

11:35am

Modeling the Effect of Green Infrastructure Implementation In the Red Butte Creek Area
Modeling the Effect of Green Infrastructure Implementation In the Red Butte Creek Area

This presentation provides an evaluation of the performance of the stormwater modeling package WinSLAMM in Northern Utah where it has not been validated before for the prediction of stormwater runoff and pollutant loading and the effects of various green infrastructure (GI) implementation strategies on stormwater impacts to Red Butte Creek.

Full Abstract
WinSLAMM is water quality model used for modeling stormwater runoff and pollutant concentrations from various urban land use sources. One strength of the model is that it can be used to evaluate the impact of green infrastructure implementation on runoff quantity and quality. However, it has been developed and tested in regions with climatic and topographic characteristics very different from that observed in Northern Utah. This study provides an evaluation of the performance of WinSLAMM in a region in which it has not been validated to date for the prediction of stormwater runoff and pollutant loading and the effects of various GI implementation strategies on stormwater impacts to Red Butte Creek. Runoff volumes and pollutant loads for Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Total Phosphorus (TP) and Dissolved Phosphorus (DP) for a series of events from 2015 to 2017 were calculated for six study areas in Northern Utah. Measured data were compared to model outputs and results indicated that the model performed poorly when default parameters where used. Thus, the model required calibration of runoff coefficients and pollutant concentrations using locally measured input data. Once calibrated, the model performed well for TSS prediction but poorly for TP and TDP unless these nutrient concentrations were predicted using locally measured TP/TSS and TDP/TSS relationships. With locally calibrated runoff parameters and locally normalized nutrient loadings as a function of storm depth, three scenarios of green infrastructure implementation (various GI system implementation of 10%, 50% and 100% of connected imperious surface) were analyzed for two subbasins within the Red Butte Creek watershed area. For the 10% GI Implementation case, treating streets produced the greatest TSS reduction, while treating roofs produced more volume reduction. For the 50% GI Implementation scenarios, runoff reduction was similar no matter the surface type being treated. However, there was a great difference in TSS reduction, with implementing GI for streets producing the greatest particulate solids reduction, followed by parking lots and then by roofs. If 100% of the impervious surface was treated by GI in these two Red Butte Creek subbasins a greater than 80% runoff volume reduction, and more than 70% TSS, TP and TDP pollutant load reduction were predicted. The decision of what GI techniques to implement and in what combination is driven by overall reduction objectives, and the contributing surface types within the drainage area. Once calibrated to local flow and pollutant loading conditions, WinSLAMM is a useful tool to evaluate stormwater management options to meet specific performance and/or compliance goals. With participation in this workshop, attendees will learn that all GI systems do not provide equal pollutant removal and runoff reduction performance, and that with locally generated input data, WinSLAMM provides managers with an effective tool to develop optimal implementation plans for stormwater management in their watersheds.

Speakers
avatar for R Ryan Dupont

R Ryan Dupont

Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Dupont is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Utah State University and has more than 35 years of experience teaching and conducting applied and basic research in environmental engineering at the Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah State University. He received... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 11:35am - 12:15pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

12:05pm

Lunch
Thursday November 15, 2018 12:05pm - 1:05pm
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

1:05pm

Citizen Science-Based Monitoring and Stewardship for the Jordan River
Citizen Science-Based Monitoring and Stewardship for the Jordan River

Monitoring and stewardship are essential for the sustainable natural areas on the Jordan River. This presentation introduces a monitoring approach that pairs scientifically valid study design with data collection by Citizen Scientists to document restoration, inform adaptive management, and increase awareness of and advocacy for the Jordan River.

Full Abstract
There are currently over 30 restoration projects along the Jordan River, ranging from small storm water treatment wetlands to large landscapes like the Legacy Nature Preserve. There are also an increasing number of “nature park” sites along the river, such as the 900 South Oxbow Wetland (Salt Lake City) and the Big Bend Nature Park (West Jordan) which allow residents and visitors to experience natural habitat areas within the valley’s growing urban footprint. These natural areas have been preserved and restored for a variety of different reasons, and are managed by different agencies or organizations with varying degrees of involvement and capacity. However, what they all have in common is the need for monitoring and stewardship. Monitoring is essential to support adaptive management, evaluate the effectiveness of restoration practices, and to document whether restoration efforts have resulted in promised increases in natural resource services. Stewardship translates into people who are aware of and care for these areas, from volunteering to pull weeds to advocating for the value of open spaces. This presentation will introduce a monitoring approach that is being developed for the Big Bend Nature Park by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Department of Interior Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR) program. By coordinating with other open space management and monitoring efforts on the Jordan River (through the Jordan River Commission and other stakeholder groups), this approach can also be tailored for different monitoring needs at other sites. A key aspect of this approach is its focus on Citizen Science, centering on guided data collection efforts by students, educators and the interested public. The goal of this monitoring approach is to collect scientifically valid data that will lead to greater understanding of ecological function, document increases in ecological services (such as water quality, flood retention and migratory bird habitat), and inform adaptive management decisions. Through the involvement of citizen scientists, it is also an opportunity to “connect people with nature” in meaningful ways—introducing them to natural landscapes, teaching them the role these places serve both for wildlife and people, teaching them what “science” is and how it works, and introducing young people to careers that they might not have considered. This involvement also translates into stewardship by increasing participants’ appreciation of what it takes either directly (e.g., volunteering) or indirectly (support of programs and funding) to maintain these areas’ environmental and social values, which is essential for their long term viability.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Cline

Chris Cline

Contaminants and Restoration Specialist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Utah Field Office
Chris has worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the cleanup and restoration of natural areas since 2002. She has been involved with habitat restoration on the Jordan River through the U.S. Department of Interior's Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 1:05pm - 1:35pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

1:05pm

Networking (open timeslot due to cancellation)
Thursday November 15, 2018 1:05pm - 1:35pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

1:45pm

Cyberinfrastructure for Improving Real-Time Water Resources Management
Cyberinfrastructure for Improving Real-Time Water Resources Management

This presentation will explore new forms of cyberinfrastructure for monitoring water resources, including autonomous robotic-sensor networks for real-time water flow and quality tracking in rivers and estuaries, wireless-sensor networks for monitoring the mountain water cycle, and machine learning algorithms to optimize sensor-network design

Full Abstract
Recent advances in low-cost and low-power sensing technologies, remote sensing, cloud computing, and machine learning present exciting opportunities to develop new resilient and adaptive civil-infrastructure systems for improving water-resources management. These systems can help to ensure the optimal use of constrained water resources, monitor aging infrastructure, adapt to infrastructure failures, and improve our scientific understanding of the environment. In this presentation, I will discuss research on new real-time sensor networks for monitoring water resources in mountains and river environments, which are key regions for storing and delivering water in the Salt Lake Valley and across the Western United States. Specific topics will include: (1) the development of an autonomous robotic sensor networks for real-time water flow and quality tracking in rivers and estuaries, (2) real-time wireless-sensor networks for monitoring the mountain water cycle, and (3) combining airborne remote sensing data and machine learning algorithms to optimize sensor-network design. I will also present and solicit feedback on future research, including the development of depth-profiling robots for the Great Salt Lake and Utah lake.

Speakers
avatar for Carlos Oroza

Carlos Oroza

Assistant Professor, University of Utah
Carlos Oroza is an Assistant Professor at the University of Utah in civil engineering. His research interests include applications of ubiquitous in-situ sensing, remote sensing, and machine learning for civil-infrastructure systems, especially for improving water-resources management... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

1:45pm

TMDL/Stormwater Approaches for Restoring Water Quality
TMDL/Stormwater Approaches for Restoring Water Quality

Summary:
Utah is currently developing the Lower Jordan River TMDL, which will affect municipal stormwater discharges. The State of Maryland has a similar program to meet the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. This presentation will both Utah and Maryland's approaches and give examples how permittees are implementing requirements.

Full Abstract:
This presentation will focus on Utah’s approach to working with MS4 permittees to fulfill permit obligations for discharges to impaired waters. All Utah MS4 permits have the requirement to document stormwater discharges to impaired waters and to comply wiith TMDL conditions. Utah is developing this approach for the Lower Jordan River TMDL and anticipates the TMDL will be finalized in 2020, which will require MS4’s to prepare and implement a plan to meet pollutant discharge goals. While Utah is currently preparing the TMDL, Maryland has already implemented MS4 permit conditions and prepared stormwater discharge goals for MS4 in compliance with the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. The Maryland program will be reviewed as well as one County’s approach to meeting their permit requirements, through their retrofit program.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Adams

Carl Adams

Stormwater Specialist, Utah Div. of Water Quality
Carl has worked for the Division of Water Quality for 19 years in the Watershed Protection, and more recently, in the Stormwater programs. The most rewarding aspect has been working with committed stakeholders throughout the State to implement water quality improvement projects. In... Read More →
avatar for Karen Nichols

Karen Nichols

Water Resource Engineer, HDR
Karen Nichols is a water resource engineer with HDR in Salt Lake City, UT. Ms. Nichols has more than 30 years of experience working with public and private clients providing environmental compliance, permitting, mitigation, and audits. She specializes in Clean Water Act (CWA) compliance... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

2:25pm

Beaver Dam Analogues: Implementation and Monitoring
Beaver Dam Analogues: Implementation and Monitoring

Stream restoration using beaver dam analogues is popular because it’s affordable and effective. Yet, monitoring is often not conducted. Wild Utah Project and partners have been using the Rapid Stream-Riparian Assessment (RSRA) protocol to assess stream condition. RSRA provides a time and cost efficient means to monitor restoration projects.

Full Abstract
The environmental benefits of beaver and beaver dams are many and well documented: beaver create aquatic and riparian habitats, provide hydrological connectivity, reduce erosion, control sediments, and reduce runoff and floods. Beaver recolonization has been used as a stream restoration tool for decades. However, beaver recolonization may not be successful everywhere; some seriously degraded systems may not be able to initially sustain beaver or reintroduction of beaver may not be feasible. The concept of man-made beaver dams (“beaver dam analogues”) began as a means to support the potential colonization of beavers and/or achieve the environmental benefits of beaver dams. The utilization of beaver dam analogues for restoration has become popular because it is affordable and effective. In light of the popularity of beaver dam analogues, there has been a call for more data and monitoring on their effectiveness. Given the limited funding and resources for restoration projects, it is beneficial for monitoring programs to be appropriate scaled to the restoration effort. Since 2013, Wild Utah Project and our agency and non-profit partners have been using the Rapid Stream-Riparian Assessment (RSRA) method to efficiently assess the condition of a stream before and after beaver dam analogues are installed. RSRA utilizes qualitative and quantitative data collected in a stream to generate a score for water quality, hydrogeomorpohology, fish and aquatic habitat, riparian vegetation, and terrestrial wildlife habitat. RSRA provides a time and cost efficient means for land managers and conservationists to monitor the results of their restoration projects.

Speakers
AJ

Allison Jones

Executive Director, Wild Utah Project
Allison currently serves as the Executive Director of Wild Utah Project. Though born and raised In California (B.A in Environmental Studies at U.C. Cruz under the guidance of her mentor and advisor, Michael Soule) she quickly left after graduation. Her path to Utah took her through... Read More →



Thursday November 15, 2018 2:25pm - 2:55pm
Lower Level - Ballroom A/B Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

2:25pm

The Water Warrior Challenge: Incentivizing Water Conservation
The Water Warrior Challenge: Incentivizing Water Conservation

The Water Warrior Challenge is an incentive based program, designed to improve Distribution uniformity over a large landscaped area. The program provides friendly competition and an avenue for the landscapers to be excited about improving the DU of their areas.

Full Abstract
The Water Warrior Challenge is an incentive based program, run by the water conservation specialist working with the landscape area managers, as the participants. The program is designed to get Distribution uniformity, or DU data from WSU’s irrigation zones to provide a way to improve the DU in each area. Distribution uniformity measures how evenly water is applied to a landscape area. The lower the DU the more water is needed to maintain the landscaping. Each of the twelve landscape area managers and the water conservation specialist chose an area that needs improvement. After an area is chosen a water audit is performed. A water audit among other things provides the DU of the zone. After the water audit is performed, a plan to improve the DU is created and executed. After the improvement has been implemented a second water audit is performed and the data is compared. The landscaper that has the most DU percentage improvement wins the water warrior challenge and a large trophy. This program has been successful in not only replacing over two hundred outdated and inefficient irrigation spray heads with high efficiency rotatory sprinkler heads and installing over 500 feet of drip line a year, but also looking at each irrigation zone individually to implementing a custom plan to perform the best improvements possible, for that area. The program also provides friendly competition and an avenue for the landscapers to be excited about improving the DU of their areas.

Speakers
avatar for Drew Hodge

Drew Hodge

Water Conservation Specialist, Weber State University
Drew Hodge is a water conservation specialist at Weber State University, in the Energy and Sustainability Office. Drew has a Bachelors degree in Geography, with an Environmental emphasis.



Thursday November 15, 2018 2:25pm - 2:55pm
Lower Level - Ballroom C Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119

2:55pm

Break, snacks, and prize drawing finale!
Stay to the Symposium close and you'll be rewarded with a chance to win the best prizes! Look for the "big ticket" signs for places to get raffle tickets.  Visit exhibitor tables, and more.  Woohoo!!


Thursday November 15, 2018 2:55pm - 3:25pm
Crossroads Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City, UT 84119